my loveliest vinyl, part 46

V/A - Streets (Beggars Banquet BEGA 1, 1977)
V/A – Streets (Beggars Banquet BEGA 1, 1977)

And now to my first and secret vinyl love – compilations! When i was young „radio taping“ was the way to obtain and keep music. Local NDR2 had an afternoon show called „Der Club“ and that did play music for young (13-16 year old) and rock minded youth. It had also snippets of the punk boom in UK and a regular „Letter from London“ show by someone called „Ruth Rockenschaub“ (i remember the name even almost 40 years on). Only later i shared a record player with my brother until owning in 1980 my own HIFI set (Dual Record Player, Sankyo Receiver and Tape Deck and self made loudspeakers).

And money we and i did not have a lot, so my initial investment into records where driven by opportunity (cheapo bin), fame (what was really cool on the schoolyard) and a harsh selection (the most „bang“ for the buck). And that is where compilations came handy – they offered on average 16 songs by 16 bands and thus gave an option to explore.

And there came „Streets“…

The verdict:
1977 – yes, by year of release and by sound style!
published by a cool label – sure, Beggars Banquet’s intial release!
found in a cool shop – cheapo bin at local Membran (back then a local record store chain) outlet in my northern suburb in 1979!
catching sound – Back then for sure, today it sound „tame“ but that is because i have been spoiled with 35+ years of listening to punk rock!
the lyrics – because my school english being rather poor i could only make out some but initially i really did not bother to much about words – it was the sound!

But sans lyrics it had a cool message on the back cover:

1977 was the year that the music came out of the concert halls and onto the streets; when independent labels sprang out of the woodwork to feed new tastes; when rock music once again became about energy and fun; when the majors' boardrooms lost control. Suddenly we could do anything. 
Beggars Can Be Choosers.

There are two highlights on this records that i adored from day one and until today:

The coolest fucking thing to me! And i still dig this one big time! And i did have the luck to see them 1984 in Hamburg at the Onkel Pö, they rocked the place (with a capital R but still ok).

Dogs (Onkel Pö, Hamburg, 1984 (c) gehkacken.de)
Dogs (Onkel Pö, Hamburg, 1984 (c) gehkacken.de)

More pictures from the show to follow once they have been restored from the original film (mishandled over many years of ignorance and plenty of house moves).

The Drones! Killer catching sound to the max! I can still sing along to this one today if you wake me up in the night.

Also on this record where other lifetime favorites like The Members, The Lurkers and The Zeros. I did dislike Slaughter & The Dogs on this one only to later stumble over the „Where have all the Bootboys gone“ 7″ and got hooked up on them too.

Little did i know about the facts: That is was a compilation of tracks taken from singles (released by other labels). That production quality was „lackluster“. That some of the bands did not exist anymore. But how should i know – nothing was in the german press, little on radio and every once in a while i could catch an NME or Sounds. Or listen to John Peel on BFBS (and sure pressing „record“ on me tape deck). But John Peel was a pain, as my englisch was not good enough to understand all he had to say.

Other cool compilations to follow suit!

 

 

my loveliest vinyl, part 45

Hermann's Orgie - Die Moderne Welt Und Andere Disharmonien... (Moderne Musik Tronträger MOD-004, 1981)
Hermann’s Orgie – Die Moderne Welt Und Andere Disharmonien… (Moderne Musik Tronträger MOD-004, 1981)

Hometown Punk. But one of the lesser known ones as were not really part of the live circuit and the city crowd, as they originated from a southern suburb. They only played a few shows before disbanding over both the need to flea the army to Berlin and the fact that their studio, that also served many other bands, was robbed (as in emptied).

They also turned to other music, Tom Meyer specifically, though he still was able to put up a new setting (Neuland Studio) that provided some bands with recording capabilities (and was home to the production of the now legendary „Waterkant Hits“ in 1983).

What was so special with Hermann’s Orgie? Their not so (hardcore) punk sound? No, don’t think so – i think it was one of the first outfits to give way to the use of the German language, something at least in Hamburg not really known: Local heroes Big Balls, Buttocks and Razors all tried to master English – with questionable quality…

The verdict:
1977 – yes, i think they can claim that big time and more then others!
published by a cool label – sure, local and self-made, just class!
found in a cool shop – Konneckschen, where else?
catching sound – Back then for sure, today it sound „tame“ but that is because i have been spoiled with 35+ years of listening to punk rock
the lyrics – i could relate to German better back then because my school english was poor, hence i loved the ones singing in a language i did fully understand. And this message was so simple and sound (i felt home and „being like them“)

My loveliest song from that one is coincidentally called „1977“ and was recorded live in 1979. Back then to me „studio“ or „live“ did not make any difference, specifically on this one as it seems recorded without any audience audible:

In unseren Strassen
In unser Stadt
Eine Revolte
Was wir brauchten

1977 - in unseren Strassen
1977 - in unser Stadt
1977 - es gab nicht viel zu tun
1977 - macht trotzdem Spass

Sie spielten laut
Sie spielten schnell
Sie waren wie wir
Wir waren wie sie

1977 - in unseren Strassen
1977 - in unser Stadt
1977 - es gab nicht viel zu tun
1977 - wir hatten Spass

Sie spielten laut
Sie spielten schnell
Sie waren wie wir
Wir waren wie sie

1977 - in unseren Strassen
1977 - in unser Stadt
1977 - es gab nicht viel zu tun
1977 - wir hatten Spass

English version:

On our streets
In our city
A revolt
Was what we needed

1977 - on our streets
1977 - in our town
1977 - there was little left to do
1977 - we had fun

They played loud
They played fast
They where like us
We where like them

(c) 1981 Moderne Musik Produktion

They did not like to continue to be part of the – back then – ever growing and more violent leather clad punk scene and they also did not like the so called „Neue Deutsche Welle“ that washed away good new music in favor of mu-sick industry (just like the punk re-break in the US in the 90s). Hence they called it a day as a band and moved their own directions. Tom Meyer is a mastering guru today and Clement Hülse is a web developer in London – like so many they choose not to hang around forever, but left a classic legacy. Thanks for that!